5 Ways a Filmmaker Could Use Broadcastr to Promote Their Film

Tweet As some of you may have seen from my tweet during DIY DAYS I was impressed by Broadcastr and its capabilities. Scott Macauley, editor of Filmmaker Magazine (who was nice enough to allow me to pick his brain for a bit after the talk) had a fireside chat with Scott Lindenbaum of Broadcastr and Electric Lit. Broadcastr is a mashup (remember when those were novel?) of audio recordings and a Google Map and you can access it on the Internet, or an iPhone/iPad/Android application. From the site: “Users can take a GPS-enabled walk as stories about their surroundings stream into their headphones, like a museum tour of the entire world. Users can record their own content, create playlists, follow their friends, and share on Facebook.” It just launched recently and already they have some impressive partners. A search in the area of Haiti will pull up several UNICEF broadcasts, a search of Chapel Hill, broadcasts by live storytelling organization, The Monti. Fodor’s and MTV personalities are also using it. Lindenbaum talked about it as a great way for local businesses to drive traffic or to just be more interesting by having people record stories about the place. The other Scott said Broadcastr is “what Foursquare should have been.” The benefits are obvious I think for poets, orators and comedians, but what about filmmakers? Don’t worry, I got you. This post will focus on 5 ways I think Broadcastr can be useful to filmmakers. 1. Create a Director/Producer’s/Somebody Important’s guide to a location I’ll go ahead and get this example Lindenbaum gave out of the way. The idea is...
How to make 75 bucks off a free film

How to make 75 bucks off a free film

Tweet A lot has been said about the best way to distribute independent films now. Some say new, independent filmmakers should concern themselves first and foremost with getting the most eyes on their work and should embrace piracy. Platforms like Eggup seek to leverage our natural tendency to share yet still provide a way of monetization for filmmakers. For others like Nina Paley of Sita Sings the Blues it’s a matter of principle: content should be free, the container shouldn’t. So how does one make money from a free film? Read on.   I don’t recall now what I was doing when I decided I wanted to watch something. I typically watch streaming films when I am multitasking, like styling my hair. This is also why there is a plethora of still to be watched foreign films in my Netflix queue, I can’t multitask and watch those. I had heard about The Yes Men Fix the World being released on BitTorrent many moons prior, most recently at the Open Video Conference and decided I would watch it. A BitTorrent virgin, I had no issues accessing the film. 87 minutes later I went to the movie’s website as I do for most documentaries that I watch. I don’t recall whether or not there was an explicit call to action at the end of the film, but that never hurts. Once there I was delighted to see all the related products I could purchase. This film is really good for related products because you don’t actually have to have seen the film to appreciate them. That’s when I saw the perfect...
Create a TV app: A conversation with Float Left Interactive

Create a TV app: A conversation with Float Left Interactive

Tweet Did you know that for less than the price to rent the fanciest video camera for a month, you could have a whole television channel? Sort of. In this interview , Tom Schaeffer, Founder and CEO of Float Left Interactive, an IPTV software development firm, talks about their services, why you should consider creating  a TV app and how to bring attention to it once you do. If I haven’t said it before, I’ll say it now, I believe in thinking big. BTBO: Can you describe in as much detail as possible, the process of having a TV app created through FL Interactive? (Is there a requirements gathering process, how long do projects typically take?) Tom: When a potential client engages FLI, we start with an initial meeting to discuss the application requirements.  The requirements gathering process can last from a day to a few weeks depending on the complexity.  Most clients are new to IPTV software and the capabilities of the various devices, so we always plan on adjustments in the requirements as the project proceeds.  Regardless, having a solid understanding of not only what the application will do, but what the client’s business goals are for the application is critical for success.  Once this process is complete, a typical project generally takes anywhere from 4-8 weeks. BTBO: The app you created for the NBA looks very fancy (read: expensive), what’s the price range to have FLI create a TV app? Is it a flat fee model or other business model? Tom: Prices vary based on the application requirements.  The NBA project was a special case since...

How to target your film to iPhone users

Tweet Those considering distributing their film on a mobile platform no doubt have the iPhone and its millions of users as a possible target. I recently sat down (as I do when I write all my emails) to “speak” to Mars Yau of the Hong Kong-based MarsApp about this viable alternative to having your film listed in the iTunes store. BTBO: Can you describe in detail the service that you provide on MarsApp.com? Can you also describe the process from the time someone hires you to create an application to the time the application is on the App Store? MarsApp: We are an iPhone App Development Team focusing on develop mobile apps. We are excited to design and develop successful applications for iPhone and iPod Touch, and will expand our app collections to iPad soon. Actually, we hope to partner with any content provider. So, when someone is interested to publish their content (e.g. movie, articles, books, graphics…) and ideas on mobile market, they can let us know the detail for review. If the idea or content is good, we will start the project and the process is just like other software development process, including Requirements Gathering, App Design, App Development, App Testing & Bug Fixing and Product Release. Of course, before the app is released to the public, it is still require to pass the Apple’s approval process, which will take around 5-10 days for app review. BTBO: How did you find Nina or how did she find you? MarsApp: At first, I found that Sita Sings the Blues is using Creative Commons License, I love the idea...
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