Why Every Filmmaker Should Learn How to Be Black + Tools You Need to Do It

Why Every Filmmaker Should Learn How to Be Black + Tools You Need to Do It

Tweet Here is my conversation today with Craig Cannon (@craigrcannon), the campaign manager for How To Be Black written by Baratunde Thurston, Director of Digital at The Onion. Pardon my voice, I am still recovering from SXSW in this talk. Make cool content. Don’t worry about giving away scalable, digital content away for free. Because that’s how you bring people in. In this he breaks down the phases of the campaign and formation of their digital street team and the tools they used, a list of which I make after the jump. He also discusses the related collateral/mini-projects that have been created to support the book and make it more participatory. Audience Engagement Tools Wufoo – Online Form Builder for street team applications Vokle – Live videocasts and recording Facebook – Private group for street team Knodes – Deep social media analysis, allowed street team to see who is most influential in their network and see their missions Asana – Project management/shared task list (Not mentioned in the interview but Baratunde told me during a separate conversation)...

Online Film Distribution 101 – Download or Stream Your Movie – Part 2

Tweet This is a follow up to the previous post called Online Film Distribution 101 but with new entrants to the streaming market: WatchFilm, PreScreen, Constellation and FilmDIY. They each have a slightly different approach and here I just focus on what’s important.  I am eager to hear your thoughts on them, whether you’d consider using them or you have used them.    WatchFilm A new entrant to the streaming video scene, WatchFilm is comparable to Dynamo and Distrify. They take a cut, have no monthly fee, seem to be focused on the UK as the currency they use when I looked at it last was Pounds Sterling. Of the four, WatchFilm takes the least as of this writing, in the neighbourhood of 25% I believe. The viewer sees a trailer of the film then can buy or rent  your film for 24 hours.  They also support iPhone, iPad and other mobile devices.   Prescreen   Prescreen takes a slightly different tack. This was created by the founder of Groupon and you can see the influence.  Each film is up for 30 days. They start off on the first day with a lower price and encourage people to share with their friends to encourage sales. After the first day the price goes up. Upon signing up for an account some basic demographic information is collected. That information is shared with you the filmmaker to help you target your marketing after (or while for that matter) your film is up on the site. They take half of the proceeds.     Constellation Constellation employs the theater/ticket model Tribeca Film Festival has...
VOD Portal MUBI Gets Viewers From Game Consoles

VOD Portal MUBI Gets Viewers From Game Consoles

Tweet This is partially cross-posted from a post I did for Filmmaker Magazine. I had a chance to interview Efe Cakerel, founder of MUBI recently. Formerly known as The Auteurs, MUBI is a VOD portal/social network for cinephiles. It’s well known for its international library. What’s really interesting to me about MUBI is their strategy for film distribution, targeting not just PCs but game consoles as well. Their game console bet has paid off as you’ll see below. What you’ll find interesting is how to get your film in front of MUBI’s international viewers. BTBO: How do you select the films that are added to MUBI’s library? Do you work with filmmakers directly or through a distributor? Are you aggregator only? If aggregator only, are there any plans to work with filmmakers directly at any point? We do all that we can to select films to show on MUBI, be it acquire new film festival releases, select choice titles from back catalogs, work with distributors on their current titles, and more.  Similarly, we work with a wide range of rights holders, from international sales agents all the way down to individual filmmakers and producers. BTBO: Are there certain criteria a film needs to meet before being added? If by “added” you mean acquired for our VOD platform, our criteria is simple: we want great films our audiences will be interested in. BTBO: What is MUBI’s business model? Advertising/sponsorship or strictly from movie rentals? The VOD platform has pay-per-view and subscription model options for renting films. BTBO: How do filmmakers on MUBI make money? MUBI splits revenue 50/50 with rightsholders....

How to Raise $10,000 in 48 hours for your film

Tweet This is cross-posted on Focal Press’ Mastering Film Blog. I received an email recently from Zak Forsman, tweep of mine, announcing his crowdfunding campaign for a film he is working on called Down and Dangerous. It’s based on his dad’s exploits as a drug smuggler. Crowdfunding is an increasingly popular way to raise funds for projects, with platforms like Kickstarter having funded over 10,0000 projects. Of those 10,000 the 2nd most successful type of campaign is for film and video, being narrowly beaten by music. I have been watching Zak’s campaign and was astounded by how much money was being pledged in a really short period of time. So I figured I’d ask him. Below is the outcome of that conversation. FP: What made you decide to embark on a crowdfunding campaign for this film? ZF: I had no choice, really.  We wanted a movie we could do this fall — something fun for our friends and fans.  I did not have the money to put up on my own so I looked to crowdfunding as a means to determine if there was a desire out there to see this from us, and to expand the awareness level around the project and to raise the budget by effectively pre-selling it in the form of HD downloads and DVDs to the audience.  That last one, I think, is not exactly how it’s playing out though.  I don’t think people are generally getting on board because of the tagline or synopsis or that they’ve been dying to see a crime thriller about a smuggler.  They are getting on board because they...
Which iPhone user are you selling your film to?

Which iPhone user are you selling your film to?

Tweet Funny infographic on 7 types of iPhone users. Hopefully you are thinking of ways to target mobile phone users for your indie film. Maybe this will help you know your audience a little better. Embed the above image on your site Direct Link by Shane Snow via  ...
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